Judge Denny Chin to help Hawai’i law school students reenact trial of Heart Mountain Fair Play Committee

U.S. Second Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Denny Chin, based in New York City, will guest lecture at the UH Law School on Tuesday, October 18, and will help student actors perform a reenactment based on trials after resistance by Heart Mountain internees.  Judge Chin and his wife, attorney Kathy Hirata Chin, created the reenactment based on trial transcripts.

In addition to teaching and speaking at a faculty workshop, Judge Chin will lead a public presentation about the Heart Mountain Relocation Center in Wyoming, one of 10 concentration camps used to intern Japanese Americans after the bombing of Pearl Harbor.  Heart Mountain is known for the active resistance offered by many of the young men incarcerated there, protesting loss of their civil rights. The short performance, featuring law student actors, will be free and open to the public in Classroom 2 at the Law School at 2515 Dole Street beginning at 5:15 p.m.

Judge Chin and Hirata Chin have been deeply involved in research about the camp, and co-wrote a script that reenacts two of the trials of the Heart Mountain Fair Play Committee. The committee was a group of young resisters who challenged the draft of young Nisei men, and who argued that they would not follow draft orders until the rights of internees were reinstated.

Today Heart Mountain is the internment camp with the most structures still intact.  It was listed as a National Historic Landmark in 2007.

Judge Chin is well known as the trial judge who, in 2009, sentenced Bernard Madoff to 150 years in prison for the Ponzi scheme that impoverished investors who had entrusted Madoff with their life savings. In sentencing Madoff, Judge Chin said, “The message must be sent that Mr. Madoff’s crimes were extraordinarily evil.”  He added that they had taken “a staggering human toll” and there was a need for “retribution.”

Dean Avi Soifer called Judge Chin’s visit an important event for the Law School, in particular because of its deep involvement in addressing and healing civil rights abuses.

Said Soifer, “It is hardly surprising that there is so much interest among our students and staff in these very important matters, in addition to the scholarly focus of a number of our faculty members.”

Professor Eric Yamamoto, the Fred T. Korematsu Professor of Law and Social Justice, for example, has spent a scholarly lifetime researching, and writing and lecturing about, civil injustice, including the incarceration of more than 120,000 Japanese Americans by their own government.  Yamamoto helped challenge the imprisonment of Fred Korematsu for defying the order to report for incarceration, winning a decisive victory in the 1980s that helped set the stage for reparations for those interned and their descendants, and a formal apology from the American government.

During their visit, Judge Chin and Hirata Chin will also meet with Law School faculty members as well as federal judges and members of the Federal Bar Association.

Judge Chin graduated from Princeton University magna cum laude in 1975, and earned his JD from Fordham Law School in 1978. Judge Chin is the only Asian American who serves as a currently active judge in the federal appellate court system. In 1994, he was the first Asian American appointed as a U.S. District Judge outside the Ninth Circuit. Hirata Chin is a leading corporate lawyer in New York City who also has led and served on multiple public interest task forces and committees.

Source: University of Hawai’i press release

Photo: Densho Digital Repository

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AALDEF Seeks Volunteers to Monitor Elections

 

AALDEF is looking for volunteers in California to monitor the November 8 elections to help ensure compliance with the federal Voting rights Act and to document instances of anti-Asian voter disenfranchisement.

In past elections, Asian Americans have faced a series of barriers in exercising their right to vote.  For example, poll workers were hostile and made racist remarks, poll sites had too few interpreters to assist Asian American voters, translated voting materials were missing or hidden from voters, and ballots were mistranslated listing Democratic candidates as Republicans, and vice versa. When the news media reported on election results and the vote by specific groups, Asian Americans were often overlooked.

On November 8, 2016, AALDEF, along with other Asian American groups and bar associations, will be monitoring the elections and conducting non-partisan voter surveys at poll sites in Asian American neighborhoods.

Advance registration required. Sign up at http://www.aaldef.net.

Polling sites in California include San Diego and San Jose.

Training Sessions:

Wednesday, October 5, 12:00 PM
Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP, 12730 High Bluff Dr, Ste 400, San Diego*

Wednesday, October 5, 6:00 PM
National Federation of Filipino American Associations, Mabuhay Room, 1603 Hoover Ave, National City*

Thursday, October 6, 3:30 PM
Asian Law Alliance, De Anza College, 21250 Stevens Creek Blvd, Cupertino, 3:30 PM

*Light lunch/dinner will be provided

Attendance at one training session is required for all volunteers.All volunteers must be non-partisan and work a 3-hour shift. (CLE trainings are 90 minutes. Attorneys can receive 1.5 CLE credits including 0.5 ethics credit.)

For more information, contact AALDEF Staff Attorney Jerry Vattamala or Voting Rights Organizer Iris Zalun at 800-966-5946 or votingrights@aaldef.org.

Karthick Ramakrishnan Joins Board of The California Endowment

The California Endowment has appointed S. Karthick Ramakrishnan, PhD, to its board of directors. Ramakrishnan is a professor and associate dean of the School of Public Policy at the University of California, Riverside. His appointment was effective August 15, 2016.

“I am thrilled to welcome Karthick to the Board,” said Board Chair Jane Garcia. “His expertise and guidance will be critically important to The Endowment and its partners seeking policy change that results in better health and well-being for California’s poor and marginalized communities, as well as for all Californians regardless of immigration status.”

Ramakrishnan, who has been at UC Riverside since 2005, previously served as a Research Fellow at the Public Policy Institute of California in San Francisco from 2002-2005. In addition, he is also an organizer for the Politics of Race, Immigration, and Ethnicity Colloquium (PRIEC), a national conference series for scholars working on issues of race, immigration, and ethnicity (2005-present).

As a published author, Ramakrishnan is the founding editor (July 2014-present) of theJournal of Race, Ethnicity, and Politics, an official section journal of the American Political Science Association. He also has authored and co-authored a number of books, book chapters, monographs, policy reports and journal articles on various topics including politics, immigrants, immigration, and race and ethnicity, among others.

A resident of Riverside, California, Ramakrishnan, is a member of the Western Political Science Association’s Committee on the Status of Asian Pacific Americans in the Profession (2011-present). His also a member of National Park Service’s Asian American/Pacific Islander Theme Study Advisory Board (January 2013-present). He is the recipient of numerous fellowships and awards including Global Fellow, Woodrow Wilson Center (2015-present).

Ramakrishnan earned his bachelor’s in International Relations and Political Science, magna cum laude, from Brown University, and his PhD in Politics from Princeton University.

The California Endowment, a private, statewide health foundation, was established in 1996 to expand access to affordable, quality health care for under-served individuals and communities, and to promote fundamental improvements in the health status of all Californians. The Endowment challenges the conventional wisdom that medical settings and individual choices are solely responsible for people’s health. The Endowment believes that health happens in neighborhoods, schools, and with prevention. For more information, visit The Endowment’s Web site at http://www.calendow.org.

Source: The California Endowment press release

Historic Quad-Partisan Presidential Election Forum Highlights Rising Influence of AAPI Vote

Bill Clinton, Sean Reyes, Gary Johnson, and Jill Stein Aim to Win Votes From Fastest Growing Racial Group

LAS VEGAS – On Friday, Hillary Clinton surrogate and former President Bill Clinton, Donald Trump surrogate and Utah Attorney General Sean Reyes, Libertarian presidential nominee Gary Johnson, and Green Party presidential nominee Jill Stein addressed more than 2,500 journalists and community leaders in the largest gathering of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) in the history of presidential campaign cycles.  

Asian and Pacific Islander American Vote (APIAVote) and Asian American Journalists Association (AAJA), with 40 partner organizations, hosted this historic Presidential Election Forum in the Colosseum at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas, Nevada, an election battleground state where nearly one in ten residents is AAPI.

“From Southeast Asia to the Indian subcontinent to Native Hawaiians, the AAPI community represents a heritage and history that spans the globe,” said APIAVote founding board member Daphne Kwok. “A recognition that this community is the lifeblood of our nation was cemented this week, as top campaign officials not only defined what AAPI meant to them personally, but also advanced discussions around how policies proposals from immigration and education to national security and trade are being focused on to empower the collective prospects of AAPIs across the country.”

During the forum, Rock the Vote announced its “Power Up” campaign, in partnership with APIAVote and youth organizations, focused on getting young AAPIs to vote. Congressman Mike Honda stated that 7,000 17-year-olds turn 18 every day. He also emphasized the power of AAPI voters to determine winners, particularly in six swing states and 85 congressional districts that are 10 percent AAPI.

AAPIs are the fastest growing racial group in the country, expected to grow from 20 million to more than 50 million by 2060. The rising influence of the AAPI community is evident in the past two election cycles, where the AAPI vote has been an important factor in election outcomes in key battleground states. In many of these states, the AAPI voter population either equaled or exceeded the margin of victory in previous presidential elections.

Congresswoman Judy Chu, who chairs the Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus (CAPAC), pointed out that in 2010, Nevada Senator Harry Reid won re-election in a tight race with the support of nearly four in five AAPI voters who made up four percent of the electorate.

Data from APIAVote’s 2016 State Factsheets show that nearly half of all registered Asian American voters identify education (48%), healthcare (47%), national security (47%), and jobs (45%) as extremely important to how they cast their ballot — issues that the Democratic, Republican, Libertarian, and Green Party representatives addressed in the forum. This same block of eligible AAPI voters also represents vital margins in swing states across the country, holding the key to determining the winner of the Presidential election.

  • Arizona: 146,000 eligible AAPI voters comprise 3% of the electorate
  • Florida: 372,000 eligible AAPI voters comprise 2.5% of the electorate
  • Michigan: 145,000 eligible AAPI voters comprise 1.8% of the electorate
  • Minnesota: 136,000 eligible AAPI voters comprise 3.1% of the electorate
  • Nevada: 177,000 eligible AAPI voters comprise 9% of the electorate
  • North Carolina: 136,000 eligible AAPI voters comprise 1.8% of the electorate
  • Ohio: 127,000 eligible AAPI voters comprise 1.3% of the electorate
  • Pennsylvania: 223,000 eligible AAPI voters comprise 2.1% of the electorate
  • Virginia: 310,000 eligible AAPI voters comprise 5% of the electorate

The historic forum plays a vital role in educating this segment of the electorate, ultimately empowering them to vote on Election Day and elevating their representative profile among national campaigns, voter mobilization programs, and global media outlets.

To access high-resolution photos from the event, visit here.

To access APIAVote’s 2016 State Factsheets, visit here.

A Word document press release can downloaded here.

Bill Clinton, Gary Johnson, Jill Stein to Appear at Historic AAPI Presidential Forum

UPDATE (8/12/16): Utah Attorney General Sean Reyes will represent Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump in this event.

Former President Bill Clinton, representing Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton, Libertarian presidential nominee Gary Johnson, and Green Party presidential nominee Jill Stein are set to address one of the largest gatherings of AAPI journalists and community members.

The Asian American Journalists Association (AAJA) and Asian and Pacific Islander American Vote (APIAVote), with more than 20 partnering community organizations, are hosting a historic Presidential Election Forum in the Colosseum at Caesars Palace on August 12, 2016 at 2PM PT.

Representatives Judy Chu (D-CA) and Mike Honda (D-CA), from the Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus (CAPAC), along with other elected officials will also deliver remarks on the rising influence of the AAPI vote.

The Asian American and Pacific Islanders (AAPI) are the fastest growing racial group in the country, growing from 20 million to more than 50 million by 2060.  The rising influence of the AAPI community is evident in the past two election cycles, where the AAPI vote has been an important factor in election outcomes in key battleground states.  In many of these states, the AAPI voter population either equaled or exceeded the margin of victory in a previous presidential election.

Recognizing the rising influence of the AAPI vote, campaigns are reaching out to AAPI community leaders and influencers to get their message out this election season. According to the AAJA, over 4,000 leaders from the AAPI community are expected to attend this event.

A livestream for this event is available, with language support in Cantonese Chinese, Mandarin Chinese, Korean and Vietnamese.  Tune in at http://www.apiavote.org/townhall/live.

For those attending the event, doors open at 1:00 PM PT.  For more information on APIAVote and AAJA activities, contact Alton Wang (awang@apiavote.org) and Kathy Chow (kathyc@aaja.org).

For press inquiries, contact Benjamin Bryant, 703-868-1262, press@aapimediacenter.org.

White House AAPI Initiative, UC Riverside Partner to Improve AAPI Data

Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders are the fastest-growing and most diverse racial groups in the country. Between 2000 and 2010, their populations grew by 46 percent and 40 percent, respectively, compared to 10 percent for the overall population, and these growth trends have continued since 2010.

Despite the increasing importance of AAPIs, there is a significant gap in what is known about these communities, with problems ranging from invisibility to mistaken assumptions that all Asian Americans are self-sufficient, well-educated, and upwardly mobile.

Hoping to correct that gap is a data challenge announced this week by the White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders and AAPIData.com, a research project of the University of California, Riverside.

ELEVATE: AAPI Data Challenge seeks to engage the public in developing novel approaches to the interpretation of data on AAPIs, particularly data that is broken out by national origin, such as Cambodian, Korean, or Native Hawaiian.

Everyone – from high school students and data hobbyists to government, nonprofit and corporate analysts – is invited to participate in this pioneering effort. Submissions may include infographics, web applications, data tables, blog posts, animations, videos, and other creative mediums. The deadline for submissions is Sept. 5.

Karthick Ramakrishnan, professor and associate dean of UC Riverside’s School of Public Policy explained that ELEVATE: AAPI Data Challenge was created to encourage a new generation of researchers, writers, and artists to develop new ways of visualizing and interpreting data about the AAPI population.

“We have seen big improvements in data on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in the last decade,” Ramakrishnan said. “We hope to inspire people to take advantage of this new data, not just for academic research but also for news reporting, storytelling, and helping to inform public policy.”

Read more on UCR Today.

Historic AAPI Presidential Forum in Las Vegas Aug. 12

Green Party presidential nominee Jill Stein will join former President Bill Clinton on behalf of Democratic presidential nominee Secretary Hillary Clinton, and Libertarian presidential nominee Governor Gary Johnson to address the Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) national community on August 12, 2016, at a historic AAPI Presidential Election Forum in Las Vegas.

Get the latest news about this event on APIAVote.org and AAJA.org.

In addition, discussions are in final stages with Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump’s campaign.

This quad-partisan AAPI Presidential Election Forum is presented by the Asian American Journalists Association (AAJA) and Asian and Pacific Islander American Vote (APIAVote).

Upwards of 4,000 leaders from business, real estate, journalism, health care, law, faith, and more, are expected to be inside The Colosseum at Caesars Palace for the Presidential Election Forum. More than 40 organizations are holding conferences, seminars, and symposiums to discuss issues relevant to their industries, professions, and communities.

In addition, more than 50 AAPI community Watch Parties will be held across the country, joining this historic event in real-time.

At the Forum, the Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus (CAPAC) led by Rep. Judy Chu, Rep Mike Honda, and other members of Congress will have a special message on how AAPI voters actually can swing this year’s election outcome as they have in the past two cycles.

Doors open at 1:00 p.m. PST. Press credentials will NOT provide access to candidates, candidate arrivals, or allow for any filming or photography at the event or on Caesars property.

 

Media Contacts

AAJA: Kathy Chow
EMAIL: kathyc@aaja.org
PHONE: 916-539-0440

APIAVote: Alton Wang
EMAIL: awang@apiavote.org
PHONE: 202-780-8801

Assemblymember Rob Bonta New Chair of API Legislative Caucus

The Asian and Pacific Islander Legislative Caucus has a new chair: Assemblymember Rob Bonta (D-Oakland). His chairmanship is effective July 1, 2016.

Bonta made history in 2012 when he was elected the first Filipino American to the California State Legislature in the state’s 165-year history.  His selection as API Caucus Chair is another historic first.

“Thank you to my good friend and outgoing Chair, Assemblymember Das Williams, whose strong and effective leadership over the past two years sharpened the Caucus’ vision, reinvigorated our work, and set all of us on a strong path toward improving the lives of Asian Pacific Islanders throughout California,” said Bonta.

“I am humbled and honored to serve with such an amazing group of talented and dedicated legislators in the API Caucus. I look forward to working together to further empower and uplift the API community in California and beyond.”

During its thirteen year history, the Caucus has worked to fulfill its mission of representing and advocating for the diverse interests of the APIA communities throughout the state. Other Caucus activities have included: serving as a resource to the community and assisting with advocacy efforts, convening the annual API Policy Summit, holding joint briefings and hearings with other ethnic Caucuses and community groups on issues of common interest, and supporting the activities of the Commission on Asian Pacific Islander American Affairs.

Assemblymember Bonta represents the 18th Assembly District, which includes the cities of Oakland, Alameda, and San Leandro. Bonta Chairs the Assembly Public Employees, Retirement, and Social Security Committee and the Select Committee on the Status of Boys and Men of Color in California.

Japanese Americans speak out in support of Muslims and Arab Americans

Japanese Americans from the Bay Area Day of Remembrance Consortium this morning expressed their support and solidarity with the Muslim, Sikh, Arab, and South Asian American communities at a press conference at the National Japanese American Historical Society. this Tuesday, December 22 at

The press conference is in response to anti-Muslim hate and rhetoric that has increased following recent terrorist attacks.

The following community leaders were scheduled to speak this morning:

  • Hiroshi Shimizu—Former incarceree, Topaz incarceration camp, Tule Lake Segregation Center, Chair of the Bay Area Day of Remembrance Consortium
  • Samina Sundas—Founder and Executive Director of American Muslim Voice
  • Hiroshi Kashiwagi—Former incarceree, Tule Lake Segregation Center.  Poet and writer
  • Karen Korematsu—Co-founder of the Fred Korematsu Civil Rights Foundation. daughter of late Fred Korematsu, Supreme Court challenger
  • Rev. Ronald Kobata—Resident Minister, Buddhist Church of San Francisco, representative of Japanese American Religious Federation (JARF)

Following the press conference there will be a brief vigil.

Members of the consortium include: Asian Improv aRts, Asian Americans Advancing Justice-Asian Law Caucus, API Legal Outreach, Campaign for Justice: Redress NOW for Japanese Latin Americans!, Center for Asian American Media (formerly NAATA, Japanese American Citizens League-SF Chapter, Japanese American Religious Federation, Japanese Community Youth Council, Japanese Cultural & Community Center of Northern California, Japanese Peruvian Oral History Project, Nakayoshi Young Professionals, National Japanese American Historical Society, Nichi Bei Foundation/Weekly, Rosa Parks Japanese Bilingual Bicultural Program, and the Tule Lake Committee.  Other organizations: Japantown Task Force, Kimochi, Inc., Sansei Legacy.

Featured photo via nichibei.org.